Clear Lake and Clear Lake Resort, Oregon – The Submerged Forest

13 11 2014
Laura rowing Rod

I take the back seat as Laura navigates. Two of the Three Sisters rise in the background.

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No photoshopping here. There really was fog to Laura’s right and sun to her left!

The 2nd weekend in November my friends and I traditionally rent cabins at Lake Billy Chinook and kayak. This year we threw tradition out the window. Instead, we rented cabins on Clear Lake at Clear Lake Resort. Clear Lake is famous for its clear water and submerged forest. Thousands of years ago, a lava flow moved across the McKenzie River at this location, blocking its flow and creating a lake.

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A tree trunk in the submerged forest.

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The “seascape” at Clear Lake.

South End Clear Green Water

In the shallows, sometimes the water was emerald green.

But there was more. The river ran through a forested valley, and the trees were submerged in the lake that formed. Today, at the head of the lake, water emerges through fast-flowing springs, and the water is crazy clear. At the foot of the lake, a waterfall spills to form the headwaters of the McKenzie River.

Clear Lake Oregon is popular for canoeing, kayaking, rowing and scuba diving. Those plying the surface can peer down into the sapphire and emerald waters, and scuba divers can see the submerged forest up close and personal.

While most November days in this part of Oregon are rainy and cold, this day was calm and sunny. We lucked out!

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Our cabin. Sorry about the focus…some moisture on the outside of the lens!

Today, Laura and I arrived first. Our group had booked two sides of a tandem cabin. Each side has two bedrooms with double beds and a double futon in the living room. A propane-fueled pot bellied stove heats each side, and there are kitchens on each side. Cost? $99 for two nights per side. Heck if you have some friends along it’s super cheap! Other facts to know…A hiking trail runs around the lake, and there are hiking options nearby along the McKenzie River. Hoodoo Ski Resort is 30 minutes distant. And there’s cross-country skiing at Ray Benson Snow Park. For mountain bikers the nationally famous McKenzie River trail awaits.

The Clear Lake Resort provides a fire pit for the cabins and we took advantage of that.

Group camping/cabin cooking presents some interesting possibilities. What to eat? What’s easy? In this situation we settled on Wok cooking. It’s practically impossible to screw up wok cooking no matter what. Plus it’s FUN. So we brought the woks, each member bringing along a different wok ingredient. Mini carrots and corn, water chestnuts, pineapple, nuts, jasmine rice, mushrooms, bok choy, broccoli,  shrimp, chicken, peppers, etc. plus a myriad sauces. YUM!Jim and Becky sapphire pool Woking

Sunday, we picked a 4.5 mile hike which ended at a really beautiful pool on the McKenzie river. Sunday it started to rain, but it didn’t matter. We got a picture of Jim Hashimoto and Becki above a sapphire pool!

All in all, the cabins at Clear Lake Resort Oregon are worth a visit!

 

 





Cabins at The Cove Palisades at Lake Billy Chinook 2012

13 11 2012

13 friends rented all three cabins at The Cove Palisades State Park on Lake Billy Chinook the weekend of November 10-11!

The Cove Palisades State Park closes in October but its cabins are available for rent all winter long. The cabins feature a living room with kitchenette and futon and a rear bedroom. Heated and with running water and with lovely views, they each sleep five. One can paddle the lovely canyons of Lake Billy Chinook from then until winter sets in.

Why go? For us human-powered recreation junkies, the thought of summer on the lake makes us cringe. Party boats, wave runners and speed boats ply the lake, their noisy exhausts reverberating off the canyon walls. There are over 100 boat slips at this marina alone! But once closed, the lake is very pretty in its quiet solitude. Further, if you reserve all the cabins, you can have the lake just for you and your friends!

I’m a happy camper with my morning cup of Joe!

This weekend, we drove over snowy Government Camp pass – in fact it was snowing on and off the entire way to the destination. Laura and I had made plans for Friday dinner – we’d grill steak on the cabin’s propane grill, and enjoy baked potatoes and salad as well as grilled veggies. These turned out delicious!

Later, Jessie, Mike and Joel, our cabin-mates for this weekend, showed up. Then we saw April and Jim. I drifted off to sleep – and yes Laura and I were up first in the morning.

Laura and Jessie by the fire.

The cabins share a five-foot diameter fire pit with a lake view. Saturday morning, we shared a fire to warm us up and had a breakfast. Jim and I each brought bins of wood.

As the sun rose and began to warm up the area a bit, Jessie, myself, Mike and Joel gazed upon the lake.

Although gray early on, it was to be a beauty of a day!

Soon it was time to paddle. Thirteen paddlers. Rod, Jim D., Jim H., Jessie, Joel, Laura, Becky, Bob, Andrea, Kristi, April, Mike and George. Getting a group of that size going doesn’t always happen in a snap.

Andrea and April almost ready…but some cars are still on roof racks!

Laura and I get our boats down to the dock early,
and she is ready to go. But as I look back toward the parking area, there are lots of kayaks remaining on roof racks! It’s going to be a while.

Last to go are Kristi and George – so Mike and I help things along by carrying their boats down to the docks.

Today is Becky’s first paddle! So we pay extra attention to her needs.

Jessie lends a hand at the dock, stabilizing Becky’s boat, which she rented from Portland State University’s Outdoor Program.

The forecast calls for temperatures in the mid 40’s and light winds, less than 10 mph. Once on the water the sun comes out and I began to believe I was over dressed! I didn’t bring a baseball hat, figuring it was too chilly. Lucky for me Kristi loaned me a sun hat she brought along.

The dominant features of Lake Billy Chinook are sky and canyon walls. The sun’s arc across the sky changes the glow and colors along the walls.

Jim D. about to head into Crooked River Canyon.

I’m not a geologist, though I took Geology 101 in college. What I can say is that examining these canyon walls tells a story. It is a story of violent volcanic activity taking place over millions of years. Layer upon layer of rocks and ash reveal the episodes. Basalt columns formed as the rocks cooled – some dozens of feet thick. Other layers are softer – ash from distant eruptions. Rain and thermal warming/cooling cracked the structures, sending rocks, sand and boulders down the sides.

We search for a lunch spot. One drawback of this lake is the few sandy takeouts. Mostly the drop off from lake shore goes straight down. We find a narrow area to disembark, but most of us just take lunch in our boats.

During lunch we see a potential change in weather dark clouds back toward the cabins, so most of us head back. But Bob, Jim D., George and April continue upstream.

Once back on shore, we retreat to our cabins for snacks, naps and getting ready for dinner.

It’s not long before dark! Tonight we have a great party by the fire pit. No shortage of firewood! The stars are out! It’s dark enough to easily spot the Little Dipper and the North Star. The Milky Way glides overhead.

We’ll see what tomorrow brings!