Photos & Videos from Lumpy Waters Symposium

9 11 2010

Paddling through Three Arch Rocks - Photo Sean Morley

In the past couple of weeks some new photos and videos came out about Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe’s Lumpy Waters Symposium 2010 in Pacific City, Oregon.

Some of the best photos were taken by Sean Morley of rock gardening & caving. These photos capture elements such as the three dimensional aspects of rock gardening – boats quickly change elevation relative to each other when the swells come in. And action!

Hey you down there! Photo Sean Morley

And P&H Custom Sea Kayaks posted really nice photos of the coaches playing out in the rocks / caves / haystacks.
Some of the boating was through narrow caves!

Below see a nice video of the weekend including nice rock gardening action by the coaches! It has some of the other elements of the Lumpy Waters weekend, too!

Photo Sean Morley





Lumpy Waters Symposium 2010 Sunday – Three Arch Rocks

25 10 2010

OK Sunday morning at Lumpy Waters Symposium I was feeling the effects of three days on the Oregon coast. Definitely a bit worn out.

Badge of honor-dry suit rash from NRS and Kokatat...1 per day

And showing the effects of a tight fitting neck gasket! Gotta do something about that.

I was scheduled to do a Three Arch Rocks tour, and I knew several paddlers had to be rescued there Saturday and one guy threw up seasick. On the other hand the weather had calmed somewhat. But I just had to be there because two of the instructors would be Leon Somme and Shawna Franklin of Body Boat Blade! They are two of the best instructors in the country and I couldn’t miss a chance at experiencing instruction with them! And Mark Whittaker of Columbia River Kayak School was also teaching. In fact, Rob Avery of Valley Sea Kayaks and Karl Cohagen of Kokatat were paddling.

Coaches Leon, Shawna, Rob and John

Three Arch Rocks National Wildlife Refuge is a really special place. It’s an Oregon landmark. Home to cormorants and gulls, it’s also a nesting site for tufted puffins, storm petrels, common murres, and pigeon guillemot.

It’s also a pupping site for the 2,000 lb stellar sea lion. It’s rare to get close to the rocks, because Federal regulations prohibit watercraft from coming within 500 ft of the rocks from May 1st to September 15th – the time when it’s calmest!

It was spectacular weather! As dawn broke frost covered grass and windshields. But the day was to warm to near 70 degrees! At breakfast everyone was talking about how crazy incredible the weekend’s weather was turning out! THREE days in a row of clear, pleasant weather in OCTOBER on the Oregon Coast? And, no fog whatsoever! WOW. It’s so unlikely especially as those of us who were trying to practice the weeks before the event kept finding the coastal conditions big – swells often over 10 ft and smOur destination comes into view!all craft warnings. We couldn’t get over our good fortune!

We headed to Oceanside, about 30 minute drive north. The route winding along the coast revealed vista after vista of fabulous headlands and gentle seas! Here’s what I saw as I neared the town.

The Three Arch Rocks tour had 24 students signed up. So it was split into three classes, and I got Shawna and Mark Whittaker! I was so excited not only to watch Shawna paddle, but to experience how she teaches.

Yeah, I knew the dry suit was open. I just threw the PFD on while carrying stuff to the beach!

Since there were so many students and coaches it took a while to get organized, but it was such a lovely morning. Everyone was in great spirits. They put some rocks on the beach and drew some lines representing Three Arch Rocks and the wave energy surrounding. Sunday’s swell was 5-6 feet max, and there was calm wind when we started. There would be some reflected waves on the north side.

Launching was pretty basic, except that once a little beyond the beach the surf was breaking in two directions, meaning you’d punch through one and then there would be another coming right at a 45 degree angle – so you’d need to quickly turn the kayak into it. Once beyond the small breakers it was nice!

Like Saturday it took me a few minutes to settle in. One problem was the paddle. I figured since it was a “tour,” and calmer I’d use the low-angle Werner Kalliste paddle. But right away, getting out through the surf zone and into the moderate swell, it didn’t feel right. Right then Shawna was talking with another student about using high angle for dynamic conditions and with that, I switched to my high angle Werner Cyprus. I should have loosened my thigh braces out a click, though!

It was 3/4 mile to the rocks. Very pleasant paddle, and as the rocks drew closer we saw there were some caves and smaller outcroppings. Plus, various birds and some small sea lions about. The sea lions, probably pups, watched us closely and once we got too close they jumped in the water and made their escape! I witnessed a brutal struggle amongst sea birds. A cormorant came up out of the water and swallowed a fish – then flew up 30 feet onto a steep ledge. Almost immediately two gulls began harassing the cormorant, until it eventually regurgitated its hard fought catch – and one gull immediately wolfed it down. So, even a swallowed fish is still in play! Not fair!

Here’s a video by Chris Lockyer, one of my Saturday instructors, of what it is like paddling in the area! Kind of hard to watch.

Watch the video by clicking on this text.

Shawna and Mark Whittaker were my coaches. Watching Shawna paddle, and experiencing her coaching was like watching a symphony performance. No matter the rocks or water surging around – every stroke/rudder movement was smooth, and all the while smiling, remembering the students’ names and giving everyone personal attention. She’s very re-assuring, calming nerves, telling students to breath deeply. We made some moves in and around the rocks near one of the big arches.

We found a small sea cave too!

Then we moved out to the weather side of the arch. There, the conditions were different as the swells reflected off the arches. But it wasn’t as unsettling as off Cape Kiwanda Saturday. Shawna suggested we paddle the surge in between two of the arches. That was fun and exciting! The swell surges in between, squeezing through the arches, and you kind of get “pushed” along as on either side of you it crashes along the rocks.

The group paddled through the arches. Randy tried to do a re-enter and roll in the swirly conditions in between the arches, but after several attempts gave up and got an assisted rescue from Mark Whittaker. Laura, back behind the arches did a nice cowboy self rescue! I didn’t feel like it because I already did that the day before. But now I regret not doing a roll out there just for kicks.

We played around the rocks for another 45 minutes, and then heard one of the other groups needed to head back because they had a sea sick paddler. We eventually decided to head back to the Oceanside beach, too.

I was one of the first to try the landing, and I picked up a little surf and rode it in, only to capsize and get thrashed in knee deep water. No matter. I forgot my Feelfree Kayak Snap Pack was hung around my neck with my non-waterproof camera inside! I dreaded opening it but was excited to find my camera 100% dry inside!

Well, the day was done. I was really stoked to have Mark and Shauna as my coaches, and maybe I’ll just have to take a session with Body Boat Blade. What a great weekend of ocean paddling!

Here is a 14 minute video of some of Lumpy Waters 2010!





Lumpy Waters Ocean / Surf Kayaking Symposium Day 1

20 10 2010

Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe put on the Lumpy Waters Symposium in 2009, and it was without doubt the highlight of the year. So when they offered it for 2010, I didn’t hesitate to sign up right away.

It is a three-day series of ocean and surf kayaking instruction, and it’s based out of Pacific City Oregon. The location is perfect. They picked Cape Kiwanda RV / Campground to stage the event. It’s walking distance from the beach and the Pelican Brew Pub. And it’s 30 minutes or less to fabulous paddling locations such as Three Arch Rocks National Wildlife Refuge and Cape Lookout. Behind Pacific City the Nestucca River meanders and is a good place for flat water instruction.

Everything is included – three days of lessons, all meals, lodging (either camping or a bed in a cabin) and this year even happy hour was hosted each night – by Kokatat Watersports Wear and Thule. Alder Creek spared nothing and reached out to bring in some of the best instructors in the country – even some world champion kayakers! I didn’t realize the level of instruction was so high until I arrived.

I spent plenty of time preparing for Lumpy Waters. Three days full of ocean / surf kayaking can wear you down. Plus the environment can put demands on anyone’s skills and confidence. So for the month ahead of Lumpy Waters, I was working with a group to find rough water for practice. We also went to as many pool practice sessions for rolling as we could handle. I spent time just preparing for endurance by “fast paddling” with my Werner Corryvrecken Carbon paddle, doing laps around Ross Island on the Willamette River.

Friday at Lumpy Waters – my class was short boat surfing. I arrived and the weather was sunny and gorgeous.

Sean Morley ripping it up!

Once registered and settled into my cabin, I enjoyed a turkey sandwich lunch and then met my class for the 1:00 afternoon session. This was when I found out one of my instructors was Sean Morley, who holds records and is a surf kayaking champion! Holy Geez. Our other instructors were Alder Creek waterman Shawn McClure, and Chris Bensch who’ve been to this beach many times

Sean Morley

We gathered on the north end of the beach at Pacific City to find some easy waves for practice/learning.

The group was using mostly dedicated surf kayaks, and there was one sit on top, and two whitewater kayaks including my medium Pyranha Burn.

It was a seven foot swell from the north which curled around Cape Kiwanda. It was windy. Windy enough for the occasional gust to cause beach sand to get in my eyes when out on the water. Before we went out Sean and Shawn explained that once we get into our routine, we should surf as a cohesive group. There’d be a line waiting for a wave and most of the time one at a time would ride in. Then, paddlers returning out to the line were to stay down beach away from those surfing. It worked out. We also picked a spot with consistent gentle waves suitable for learning.

Surfing involves lots of patience because not every wave is ideal to ride. You need to learn to pick out a good one and then get the timing right to ride it. Get the timing wrong and most of the time it will pass under you. It’s also important to have an active paddle in the water. That doesn’t necessarily mean paddle blades whirring like a hummingbird, just might mean a low brace or a stern rudder. Though in my case, it seemed nerves made me more like the bird! With enough experience and time on the waves I think I can learn to carve.

I rode a whole lot of waves in. The way swells work, every so often there’ll be a group of three or four huge ones with smaller ones in between. I was intimidated by those big ones but Sean was encouraging us to ride them in.

I rode some of the waves all the way in, and some others blew it and rolled over. Twice I was able to roll up. One time I got nervous and abandoned ship, and another I was just sucked out of the cockpit altogether – no chance to even decide. Result? Nothing. Nada. Who cares? Just empty the boat and go out again.

Later on I watched as the fear to fun class took their knocks in the surf!

The best was to roll up to have Sean Morley standing waist deep giving me the two thumbs up!

Later that day Thule sponsored a most generous happy hour, which was followed by a Mexican feast cooked up by a crew from All Star Rafting. There were 80 students plus instructors to feed.

Thule had a sweet party trailer! It had a roof top deck, a big stereo/TV on the side to show movies, and they put on a nice spread of shrimp, veggies, Deschutes Mirror Pond Pale Ale, and various types of wine – bottomless! To say the least the guests were satisfied.

Stories of the day shared with friends!

And lots of stories were told of the day’s activities. I heard a long boat surf class out by the mouth of the Nestucca River had numerous capsizes and rescues. Sounded like the surf down there was a lot harder!

Following the meal, Rob Avery, instructor and sales rep for Valley Sea Kayaks, showed a presentation of an expedition to remote Aleutian Islands.

All in all a very full day! Some of us tried to stay up a little longer but everyone drifted off to their sleeping spots for the night. Saturday would no doubt test our mettle again!








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